2017 NFL Draft
Scouting Report
Prospect:  Stacy Coley


   

School:          Miami FL
Ht:  6'-1"       Wt:  195
Eligibility:      SR
Uniform:       #3
Position:      WR






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Receivers can be tricky to evaluate when projecting them from college to the NFL, and Coley is no exception. He has been a presence in the Miami offense since walking on campus and had a bounce-back year after a quiet sophomore campaign. Now he looks to breakout as a senior on a team that has a lot to be optimistic about offensively.

The most prolific aspect of Coley's game is his speed. He has the ability to accelerate and turn any play into a big one. He can eat up a defensive back's cushion in a hurry, and force him out of his back pedal. He may not run a professional route tree at Miami but with some work, I think he could be an above-average route runner because of this initial burst. He is also a constant threat deep which forces teams to keep a safety back and opens up things underneath.


Miami has used him a lot in the screen game, and when he gets the ball with blockers ahead of him, defensive coordinators hold their breath. He has also been used on gadget plays like reverses. He showed a pretty good feel for fielding punts, and will almost certainly get a look in the return game at the next level.

While I do consider Coley a possibility to go in the top two rounds, there are plenty of things that he can improve on. For starters, he doesn't have bad hands, but the ball tends to get to his body a little too often. He also doesn't have much lateral quickness. His game is about finding a crease and getting to full speed. When there isn't one, he doesn't have that ability to make a man miss. That can occasionally hurt him against the press as well. Many play off of him because of his ability to leave them behind, but if they get their hands on him early, it can take him out of the play.


He also has a slender build which makes him more of a finesse player. He isn't exactly tough over the middle, nor a blocker in the run game. If coaches want to send him over the middle, it will likely be on short drag routes that can get him the ball quick and let his speed carry him across the field. Still, the most concerning issue is his emotions. There were a few tapes where it seemed like every time he touched the ball he was looking to rub it in the nearest defender's face. It is one thing to jaw back and forth with a corner but another to let it get out of control. When it gets out of control, it affects a player's focus, and that causes mental lapses. We have seen it with Dez Bryant in his early years, and more recently with Odell Beckham Jr., emotions can be a distraction.

To say he is a great all-around receiver is just not true. There will be things that less talented receivers do better than him, but he has the speed to be one of the most dangerous receivers in the NFL someday. That alone will tempt teams in the first two rounds. If he can make some subtle improvements to his game as a senior, he could threaten to be one of the top three receivers drafted.

Compares to (Current NFL Player): Ted Ginn Jr. (Carolina Panthers) or Chad "Ochocinco" Johnson (Former Cincinnati Bengal)

Strengths
- Elite Speed, Elite Speed, Elite Speed
- A factor in the screen game as well as on returns
- Although built slender, is on the taller side for a man with his speed

Weaknesses
- Occasionally traps the ball with his body
- Finesse player
- More straight-line speed than agility
- Raw as a route runner
- Must keep emotions in check


Austin Smith
Austinjs14@aol.com
August 5, 2016



Articles/Links
1)   Miami Hurricanes' Stacy Coley reflects on the "whooping" that changed his life   - PalmBeachPost.com
2)   Behind Stacy Coley, which Miami Hurricanes wide receivers are stepping up?   - PalmBeachPost.com
3)   Stacy Coley Instagram





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