O/A Rank Top-15 Tight Ends
31 Hayden Hurst
55 Mike Gesicki
64 Dallas Goedert
78 Mark Andrews
87 Dalton Schultz
89 Ian Thomas
141 Troy Fumagalli
157 Durham Smythe
173 Ryan Izzo
196 Ethan Wolf
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Drafttek Position Rankings


















2018 NFL Draft Recap

Analysis and Grades | May 2, 2018 12:05 PM EST
1 Arizona Cardinals                 





Ultimately, the success of the Cardinals' draft class is going to sink or soar with the development of RD1 QB Josh Rosen. Rosen is a polished passer with experience under center, terrific footwork, and natural accuracy that projects well to the next level. I'm impressed that GM Steve Keim parted with only RD3 and RD5 picks to move up to select the #4 prospect on our Big Board. RD2 WR Christian Kirk, who we have graded as a +22 value, is a strong route runner with plus athleticism and return skills. Kirk has a chance to emerge as an immediate contributor in Arizona's passing attack next season. The Cardinals' last four picks were all graded as reaches, with an average value of -98. RD3 OC Mason Cole was a four-year starter at Michigan and offers positional versatility as a do-it-all backup with starter upside. RD4's Chase Edmonds could make some contributions as a change-of-pace back behind David Johnson. Both Cole and Edmonds could conceivably be valuable role players as early as 2018. RD6 CB Chris Campbell and RD7 OT Korey Cunningham are traits-based picks that will need some seasoning before they are ready to contribute. Arizona started out strong, but could have found more value through the later rounds. Josh Rosen's development will be the biggest factor in determining this class' success, and he appears to have as good a chance as any of the RD1 selections to become a franchise QB.

Grade: B+

2 Atlanta Falcons                 





This winter, Dan Quinn pronounced himself satisfied with the state of the roster. Most people took that with a massive grain of salt. Surely, Atlanta would add talent to the defensive interior early and often. It turns out he was being honest; he liked his roster as is. As a result, the 2018 Draft proved to be about adding talent and depth via value picks, as opposed to targeting needs. With Jones and Sanu nearing 30, they added Calvin Ridley, who figures to start 2018 as the WR3 and start 2019 as WR1b. Similarly, in RD2, Atlanta added to an already-strong secondary with Isaiah Oliver, allowing them to erase the past draft mistake of Jalen Collins. Oliver's size and length will eventually push Robert Alford into the slot. Finally, in RD3, they drafted for need, adding Deadrin Senat (suh-NOT) to play NT. This might have been the only reach for need in this draft, as most of the Falcons' known targets were off the board. On Day 3, Atlanta added a "gadget back" in Ito Smith, who should produce immediately in the passing game and is a natural fit for the outside zone system. Atlanta made a commitment to special teams by trading up to grab Russell Gage as a gunner and possible returner. Foyesade Oluokon will add depth behind Duke Riley and Kemal Ishmael at the hybrid LB/S spot. Atlanta will still have questions about their interior run defense, but they accumulated a lot of talent and greatly increased the depth of their roster.

Grade: A-

3 Baltimore Ravens                 





Ozzie made the most of his last draft- making six trades and bolstering the Baltimore roster, with a rare focus on offense. The headliner of the class is, obviously, Lamar Jackson. His role in 2018 is unclear, but the expectation isn't: the former Heisman-winner is the future of the franchise. If that promise is fulfilled, the leap back into the first round to nab this dynamic athlete will be the final legacy piece of one of the league's all-time great executives. But that's not all he accomplished this draft. The RD1 selection of Hayden Hurst was probably a bit of a reach for the 25-year-old, but he should be an immediate impact performer. RD3's Mark Andrews was great value that late, and the two should give the Ravens an elite pair of tight ends that will make it very difficult to scheme against. Ozzie's other pick in the 3rd, Orlando Brown, was available due to a Combine performance that was Carl Lewis National Anthem-level bad. Still, Brown has the tape and potential to be an above-average right tackle and is worth a take at #83. I like the additions of Jaleel Scott and Jordan Lasley to the receiver corps and, combined with free-agent signings, at least one should make a roster of improved pass catchers. And, in his last draft, Ozzie could not help but add two Alabama products in CB Anthony Averett and C Bradley Bozeman. Both were great value selections. Another strong draft and a fitting final performance.

Grade: A-

4 Buffalo Bills                 





Beane's Bills definitely drafted for the future. It felt... unWhaley-ish for a change. The War Room's pick of Josh Allen as its QBOTF flew in the face of fans clamoring for Mayfield-Rosen, but Allen's personality, upside, and mobility trumped The Pinata and The Wee One. Trading away both RD2 picks for DraftTek's #9th-ranked prospect, Tremaine Edmunds, was well worth it, because the Bills need a big field general on both sides of the ball. Edmunds' comp is Kuechly, who McDermott had in Carolina at the Mike, and Josh Allen's comps are Luck and Wentz -high upside, indeed. The next four picks felt like the confluence of need and value. My pet cat, Harrison Phillips, a national-champion wrestler, is the heir apparent for Kyle and the backup for Lotulelei. He led the Cardinal in tackles from a 3-4 NT position! Taron Johnson, whose zone awareness at NCB is his calling-card, should start right away. Depth at S is ably provided by Siran Neal, who's played LB, CB, and S. Left Guard Wyatt Teller should be an "incognito" signing.

The two WRs were WTF picks for fans, as EQB got passed over twice. Turns out that these guys' work ethic and interpersonal skills are all over EQB's. I love our UDFAs, especially the O-Line signings (Ike Boettger, Mo Porter), Brian Daboll's former WR Robert Foster, and sackmeister DE/LB Mat Boesen. We all need to suspend judgment on The Process, but this feels like a great beginning.

- Dean Kindig, Bills Analyst

Grade: A-

5 Carolina Panthers                 





Marty Hurney told us that his focus was to add speed and youth to this team. Man, did he do just that. In RD1, they added DJ Moore, who runs a 4.4 forty and completely changes the WR room. Then in RD2 Hurney picks up the man dubbed "the fastest man in College Football" in 2017. Donte Jackson brings the bravado back to the Panthers' secondary and the only question is if he can handle the run-support side of things the Panthers demand of their corners. Two fingers up, yes pun intended, on the Safety out of Tennessee that they grabbed in RD3 as I think he will fit into the Free Safety spot right away. The potential steal of the draft was Ian Thomas. He has similar athletic skills as Antonio Gates and we all know what Norv Turner did for him. On the down side, they did not get any offensive linemen or a running back. They did, however, bring in a QB, three offensive linemen, and a running back as UDFAs. The jury is out on this draft class but I like the potential and we certainly added speed. Is it football season yet?! ~@PanthersDrafter,Panthers Analyst

Grade: B

6 Chicago Bears                 





First and foremost, this draft was a resounding success for Ryan Pace and his team. The first three picks resulted in three potential starters on a squad that feels it's only a few pieces away from serious contention. At RD1#8, Butkus Award winner and Derrick Brooks clone Roquan Smith fell into the Bears' lap after some discussion of his going in the top 6. Smith is an exceptional athlete and leader who plays above his height. He should be the next great MLB to call Soldier Field home. Second round G/C James Daniels was mocked in RD1 by many, and has a chance to be a starter from Day 1, whether it is at Guard to replace the departed Josh Sitton, or at his natural position of C, allowing Cody Whitehurst to move back to G. Daniels is only 20 years old and could be a fixture for the next decade. Pace's big move was moving up to grab ultra-productive WR Anthony Miller out of Memphis at pick #51. Some say he is undersized, but Miller's playmaking and route-running compare favorably to fellow small/small-school player, Antonio Brown. He could be a steal and a reliable #2 as soon as this season. The remainder of the Bears' picks are a puzzling mixed bag of special teamers and overall oxygen thieves, none of whom seemd to address major areas of need. RD4 OLB Joel Iyiegbuniwe is undersized and seems destined for kickoff coverage in an era where kickoffs might be discontinued. High-risk, high-reward DE Josh Sweat would have made a lot more sense here. RD5's Bilal Nichols is a big DT from Delaware who at best will replace Mitch Unrein with similar production. RD5 DE Kylie Fitts has had injury problems, but may find a role, while RD7's Javon Wims is a big receiver who can win jump balls, but lacks the athleticism to be anything more. From top to bottom, it's not an awe-inspiring collection, but the early picks deserve the rave reviews they have received. Failure to address needs at End and Corner push the final grade down from its early promise.

Grade: B+

7 Cincinnati Bengals                 





Cincinnati finished the season tied for 29th in rush yards per attempt (3.6) and tied for 13th in most sacks allowed (40), so they made big moves along the offensive line with their RD1 pick, first trading back with Buffalo to pick up Cordy Glenn, then drafting Billy Price. The rest of the draft was then primarily focused on retooling the defense, adding players like Wake Forest S Jessie Bates, talented LB Malik Jefferson, pass rusher Sam Hubbard, and former Five-Star recruit, Andrew Brown, along the defensive line. The defense was above average last season, so it seems like a bit overkill, but Geno Atkins, Carlos Dunlap, Preston Brown, and Vincent Rey (among others) are all free agents after this season, so they did a great job preparing in advance and capitalizing on falling talent, considering players like Jefferson and Hubbard received RD1 hype throughout the season. The Bengals were also able to add some extra skill players around Andy Dalton, including RB Mark Walton, who could be a good complementary player to Joe Mixon, and Auden Tate, who, while a 7th round pick, could see the field in red-zone situations, especially if Tyler Eifert continues to struggle staying healthy. All in all, this was a very solid draft for a team that has been stuck among the league's "average to above average" teams.

Grade: B+

8 Cleveland Browns                 





I have tried to examine every angle of the Browns' draft class, and I have to admit, I am still not sure what this team does so much differently than the rest of the league. The first pick just baffles me for a variety of reasons, but none more than it seems like a typical Browns' pick. How can that be the case, when the Browns constantly turn over their front office and coaching staff? How is it that they are always on a different page than the majority of league? At what point does Jimmy Haslem interview these guys and say, "that kind of out-of-the-box thinking is what got us in the position we are in?" I understand being confident in your opinions, even when they go against the grain, but at what point does Jimmy Haslem say, "No sir, I want someone that sticks to the consensus," because every other team in this league makes better football decisions than the Cleveland Browns. Sam Darnold should be this team's quarterback. I am not saying that Baker Mayfield cannot be successful in this league. I am saying that the odds are in Darnold's favor, and I am not buying the nonsense about Mayfield being a leader of men. He was a leader of 19-, 20-, and 21-year olds, not grown men with families, and reputations in their community and the public eye. Among men, the nail that sticks out most, usually gets hammered, and the knock on Mayfield is that he loves to stick out. He loves the attention. I don't hate the Denzel Ward pick, and I understand the argument that there may not have been another CB in this draft that deserved to be taken in RD1, so if they wanted a difference-maker, they needed to jump on Ward. The problem is need picks like that often result in regret over the players they passed on. I don't know what Ward can do for their secondary that a dominant pass rush couldn't, and that is why I would have selected Bradley Chubb. I am a big fan of Austin Corbett, but I don't know where he fits on this offensive line. They are either going to play him a position that he is not equipped to handle, or they are going to move a veteran from a position in which they were proven. I love the selection of Nick Chubb. As I said during the draft, I don't know if there are many players in any draft that you can expect to come in and have the kind of presence that Joe Thomas had in the locker room, but Chubb is one I'd put my money on. Chad Thomas is a player that is a better fit to stop the run, which makes sense given that Myles Garrett and Emmanuel Ogbah are better at rushing the passer. Then we come to Antonio Callaway. How does Jimmy Haslem let that pick happen? You've got Jarvis Landry, who fell out of favor in Miami, and Josh Gordon, who is one mistake away from being done in this league. I have no problem with second chances. Callaway is way past that, and that was before he failed and lied about the drug test at the Combine. Let's not forget the Caleb Brantley pick from last year. I have no issues with the last three picks. They all have the ability to create competition on the back end of the roster, but the top has too many question marks, and despite the constant shuffling of decision-makers in this franchise, that never seems to change. I don't get it, and that leads me to believe that we will be discussing this team picking at the top of the draft again a year from now. ~ Austin Smith

Grade: D+

9 Dallas Cowboys                 





It certainly was an interesting 3 days and the Cowboys were able to address most of their team needs by allowing the draft to come to them (or as Cuzzin Jerruh is apt to say, "We kept our powder dry!"). Although we explored a number of alternatives at DraftTek, two theories expressed by yours truly came to fruition: 1) Total snaps lost in FA indicated LB and OL would be addressed in RD1 and RD2, and 2) Pre-draft visitors are a good indicator of draft choice investments. Ol' Long Ball correctly predicted the correct selections in RD1, RD2, RD4, and a RD6 player I thought would cost them a RD4 pick. RD1's Leighton Vander Esch (or LVE, as he's become known to True Believers) displays the size and athleticism to be a 3-down LB and should be a Day-One starter at MIKE. RD2's Connor Williams had a late 1st / early 2nd round grade and I honestly thought they would trade up to select him (sorry Beagle Trolls; Williams was the choice all along . . . your trade up for TE Dallas Goedert just wasted draft capital!). His athleticism promotes a 5-position flexibility on the OL . . . he will start at LOG but also provide insurance for Tyron Smith's back problems. Michael Gallup was a consideration, but I thought he would cost the RD2 selection . . . and here he was at RD3#81! Good size/speed combination, runs every route on the tree, explodes out of breaks and has excellent hands . . . the WR room just got crowded! RD4's EDGE Dorance Armstrong was a surprise . . . and then I learned Dallas tried to trade back into RD3 for him! The second RD4, TE Dalton Schultz, I predicted as a potential successor to Jason Witten, with many of the same attributes Witten exhibited coming out of Tennessee. RD5's QB Mike White was a value pick, as we had him in our Top 100 . . . big, strong-armed passer who had a great week at the Senior Bowl. RD6 LB Chris Covington should contribute on ST and the second RD6 selection (WR Cedrick Wilson) was the player I projected in RD4 . . . yet another excellent size/speed combination who runs every route on the tree. RD7 RB Bo Scarborough is strictly a short-yardage specialist. Now factor in the 2 trades: RD6 #192 to the Rams for Tavon Austin (RD1 #8 in 2013) to replace Ryan Switzer (RD4 in 2017), who was traded to the Raiders for DT Jihad Ward (RD2 in 2016), since DT was not addressed in the Draft. Add in 15 UDFA signees and the talent-acquisition process (which includes FA signings prior to the Draft) appears to be a success. The only unknown factors at this point are a space-eating DT and a center-field FS . . . and who knows, those players may be on the roster or added at a later time. - Long Ball, Cowboys Analyst

Grade: A

10 Denver Broncos                 





This class gets a passing grade on Bradley Chubb alone. The entire league seemed to believe that the Broncos wanted out of the fifth spot, and they were right, because there was no way Bradley Chubb was going to fall to this pick. Never underestimate the Browns' ability to Brownie things up. Now' from there, I have my concerns. Everyone seems to love the two wide receivers they drafted' but don't they already have a big, physical receiver that can't separate, and has occasional drops? Don't they already have an undersized receiver who runs good routes, and can make things happen in the open field? Don't both those guys have contracts with a lot of money left on them over the next two years? It's not that I don't like the picks or the value, I just don't see how you get your money's worth while also getting these rookies on the field. I am also less optimistic on Royce Freeman. Maybe this one is just me, but I felt like a lot of his stats were inflated due to the fact that Oregon lacked weapons. From then on, I was a big fan of what the Broncos did. Yiadom has the potential to be a starter in this league one day, and more importantly, he gives that group of corners some size. Josey Jewell was one of the most instinctive linebackers in this draft, and he could compete to start on that defense. He also brings character to that defense, which has been suspect in recent years. Last year, Denver took one of my favorite tight ends in Jake Butt, and this year they do the same with Troy Fumagalli. Don't underestimate the versatility these two can have when on the field together. You can spread things out and throw it, just as easy as you can line them up inside and run it, and that allows the coaching staff to take advantage of the defensive personnel. Bierria checks a lot of the same boxes as Jewell, making the ILB position very competitive going into training camp. I am disappointed it took the Broncos nearly six full rounds before they addressed the offensive line, but Jones does has some versatility that can add depth to this roster. They must have seen something I didn't with Williams, because I didn't believe he would be drafted. The size/speed combination looks enticing, but I didn't see it show up on the field very often. Overall, offensive line is still an issue, and I am not sure if they come out of this draft with a running back better than the ones that are already on the roster, but the top pick was a home run, and plenty of the others have the ability to stick. ~ Austin Smith

Grade: B+

11 Detroit Lions                 





In Bob Quinn's third NFL Draft for the Detroit Lions, he yet again leaves us fans feeling somewhat underwhelmed, but content. The offensive line needed some patch work (Frank Ragnow and Tyrell Crosby), RB was still a need (Kerryon Johnson), DB needed an infusion of youth (Tracy Walker), and the DL needed a pass rusher (Da'Shawn Hand). I can't argue against anything the Lions did in this year's draft as the selections seemed calculated, meticulous, and purposeful. For me, this approach by Quinn and the gang just has that "right" feeling to it. As the old adage goes, "football is won in the trenches", and that's the kind of draft the Lions had in 2018. I was pretty surprised by the RD1 selection of Frank Ragnow, but one that left me excited. Am I mad that I got their RD1 selection wrong? Not really. I'd like to think I was on similar wavelengths with Detroit since I had gone back-and-forth from week-to-week by selecting both Ragnow and Billy Price in RD2 mocks. It may not have been a "sexy" pick, but Ragnow is a beast. As I've cited so many times before, when you didn't allow a single sack in your collegiate career in the SEC, you're doing something well. I wasn't as surprised in RD2 with the selection of Kerryon Johnson, but I was most surprised at the fact they moved up to get him. At that time, the top available RBs were Johnson, Freeman, and Guice. From Quinn's evaluation, he wasn't interested in Guice and the fact the Lions moved up to get Johnson speaks volumes that they weren't interested in anyone else. In fact, my money says they wanted Ronald Jones; hence the urgency to move up and take Johnson as RBs were starting to fly off the board in RD2. The selection of Darius Slay's cousin, Safety Tracy Walker, was a huge surprise to me, given that Alabama standout Ronnie Harrison and Texas A&M freakazoid Armani Watts were still on the board. I'll trust Quinn's judgement here, but it doesn't mean we can't be critical of the selection. In RD4, when I saw Da'Shawn Hand's name called, I was ecstatic. To get an edge rusher like Hand late like that could be considered a steal. He was, after all, considered the nation's best recruit in 2014 by Rivals.com. RD5 slotted Detroit with Tyrell Crosby. I like this guy and he was actually ranked pretty high up on the DraftTek Big Board. Quinn loves his versatility and as I've highlighted in recent weeks, versatility is one of Quinn's highly-sought-after attributes when assessing a player. He should work his way into a starting role upon an injury or when T.J. Lang/Rick Wagner move on from the team. Finally, in RD7, Detroit took a FB in Nick Bawden. It will be interesting to see just how they use Bawden as again, this selection signals a change in the run-game mentality. Overall, this draft wasn't a home run per se, but it did address needs both for the short-term and long-term. - Doug Hyde, Lions Analyst

Grade: B

12 Green Bay Packers                 





This was a very interesting draft for the Packers. New GM Brian Gutekunst was basically admitting Ted Thompson's drafting of two CBs with their first two selections three years ago turned out to be failures, yet he was not afraid to do it again. The difference this time being Jaire Alexander and Josh Jackson are true corners, not conversion projects. Something lacking from the Packers' defense for years under Ted Thompson's reign has been an ILB that can actually cover. Combine phenom Oren Burks, while maybe over-drafted a bit, will plug that hole. After that, the Packers continued adding to their basketball team with some very tall wide receivers, the shortest of which was 6'3" J'Mon Moore. The other two are a mouthful to say and handful to type, Marquez Valdes-Scantling and Equanimeous St. Brown. Hopefully they'll be a handful for opposing CBs to cover. Cole Madison was a very good value in RD5, and will be given the chance to win the RG spot and possibly even fill in for the injured Bryan Bulaga at Right Tackle. Packers Twitter got into a kerfuffle when Gutes selected a punter and a long snapper --something his predecessor would be loath to do. On the down side, the DL and EDGE positions were not addressed until given a perfunctory look in RD7. However, Gutes' trade maneuvering basically netted out to the Packers earning another first round pick in 2019 in exchange for a third-rounder this year and dropping down four spots in RD1 Thursday. Add in that they got the guy they supposedly wanted anyway in Alexander, and that trade is a big win for Gutes in his first NFL Draft.

Grade: A-

13 Houston Texans                 





For the first two rounds of the 2018 Draft, the Texans might as well have been plopped on the couch like the rest of us watching it on the TV with a bag of chips in their laps. When they finally did make a pick in RD3, it was a good one. Stanford safety Justin Reid is the new breed of NFL safety: he can play deep centerfield, or come up and cover a slot receiver. Reid's versatility is his strength; over 65% of Reid's defensive snaps at Stanford were at outside CB, slot corner, or at linebacker in passing situations. His 2017 production was outstanding with 99 total tackles, 5 INTs, and 6 pass break ups. I had Reid rated as a late RD1 prospect due to his ability to cover slot receivers. A great comp for him is the Eagles' Pro Bowl safety Malcolm Jenkins. Reid was an outstanding value in RD3. Later in the same round, the Texans selected OT Martinas Rankin. Some had him as a RD2 talent...others closer to a RD4 or RD5 type of prospect. However, due to positional importance and the fact that he's thought to be versatile enough to play all five O-Line spots, this was a solid gamble. Rankin needs to hit the weight room HARD. Rankin is a classic boom-or-bust prospect. TE Jordan Akins was the Texans' third RD3 pick. With more established tight ends still available (Ian Thomas, Durham Smythe, etc) the feeling here is that this was the weakest selection of their draft. Slot receiver Keke Coutee was a solid RD4 selection. The last of the more common names to show up on the Texans' draft roster was 6th round LB Duke Ejiofor from Wake Forest. Behind Justin Reid in RD3, this was the second-best value pick of the weekend from the Texans. With 21.5 sacks in the last three years, the hope is Ejiofor can provide a pass-rushing boost from the OLB position. The Texans wrapped things up with TE Jordan Thomas, LB Peter Kalambayi, and CB Jermaine Kelly. Overall, it would have been nice if the Texans had gotten Deshaun Watson a bit more protection on the O-Line to go along with Rankin. I think there were also better TE options in the third round. Getting a RD1 talent in Justin Reid in RD3 saved the Texans' report card for this draft.

Grade: C+

14 Indianapolis Colts                 





There are many ways to slice and dice the haul the Indianapolis Colts took in during the 3 days of the 2018 NFL Draft, but then there's the easiest way: to accept that this is the roster foundation being laid by GM Chris Ballard and new HC Frank Reich, along with their new DC Matt Eberflus. With the lone exception of Guard Quenton Nelson, many believe the Colts left some "higher-rated" players on the board. Well, maybe, but whether they did or didn't isn't relevant. That's because this roster, especially on defense, is going to be predicated on speed. So some of the guys we all thought would be "likely" or "sure bets" for Indy ended up elsewhere, leaving a large amount of Colts' fans were watching and wondering, "Huh!??!" For better or worse, what you have been witnessing is the foundation being laid. Like watching sausage being made, it's not always pretty. Will it translate to "W's" and playoff appearances soon? Who knows? One thing is certain: GM Ballard has a plan, a philosophy, and a goal. He hasn't deviated from it yet. He'll either get there or he won't, and right now, we're just along for the ride.

Overall Grade: C+

15 Jacksonville Jaguars                 





Overall, the Jaguars had a pretty strong haul in 2018, adding a lot of high-upside depth that will likely net future starters. Defense and pass-catchers were the priority, and that is where their first three picks went. Taven Bryan can play DE and DT, and his elite first step should help him become a consistent disruptor. Some are calling this a luxury pick for the Jags, but the pick makes sense. Even if Bryan isn't a full-time starter until next year, the defensive line has enough contracts that are either expiring soon or too expensive . Those guarantee that some guys will be gone in the next couple of years. Bryan can rotate early on, while developing his game to take over as an eventual starter. DJ Chark is tall and fast. Though not a finished product, his physical traits are enough to come in and offer a mismatch, creating space for his teammates. Both Ronnie Harrison and Will Richardson offer depth in the short term, with the possibility of developing into starters at strong safety and right tackle, respectively. Tanner Lee is a developmental QB prospect, Leon Jacobs will boost special teams and compete for a spot at LB, and Logan Cooke is a versatile kicking option that can provide an extra leg for training camp.

Grade: B+

16 Kansas City Chiefs                 





If we are talking about a conventional-style defense, then this year's draft is a bust for Chiefs. However, this team utilizes a Bob Sutton defense which relies on hybrid-type players, especially at the safety role. That is what the Chiefs targeted and received: a DE/LB hybrid in Breeland Speaks (RD2); a S/LB hybrid in Dorian O'Daniel (RD3); and, a couple of S/CB hybrids in Armani Watts (RD4) and a possible sleeper, Tremon Smith. Who knows? This could work out well. The trade up for 2-down DT Derrick Nnadi is a bit of a head-scratcher, especially considering their interest in Deadrin Senat, who was also available. I commend the efforts to fix the defense. With the exception of Reginald Kahlil McKenzie Jr. (RD6), who'll be a Guard, all selections were reaches in my book. No home runs; multiple projects. Final thought: Does the addition of Sparks mean that Tanoh Kpassagnon is a flop?

~ KCBudMan, Chiefs Analyst

Grade: C-

17 LA Chargers                 





The Chargers geared up for Phil Rivers' last big run by adding speed and toughness to an already-talented defense. Derwin James sliding to 17 was a gift that the Chargers happily accepted, and USC edge rusher Uchenna Nwosu added speed and depth in RD2. A position of need was addressed, maybe a few picks higher than he projected, with UNC NT Justin Jones at RD3#84. With those restocks in place, LA went for some versatile athletes in C Scott Quessenberry and LB/S Kyzir White in the middle. Down the stretch, the Chargers added intriguing depth on the offensive side with WR Dylan Cantrell and RB Justin Jackson. It was a solid haul, with a potential superstar up top and key needs met throughout. This group should see a lot of snaps this year and many more down the line. They didn't get a QB of the future, they didn't get an inside 'backer, but they got a ton of the kind of useful athletes they need. Bravo.

-- Jud Branam, Chargers Analyst

Grade: A-

18 LA Rams                 





The Rams had an outstanding offseason before the draft, using their top picks to acquire proven talent. Ndamukong Suh and Brandin Cooks lead the haul of new faces, but the Rams also did well in retaining their own talent (Dominique Easley, John Sullivan, et al.). The Rams possessed 11 draft picks, although none better than the #89. The team will be bringing back the 2017 OL intact in 2018, but that didn't stop them from a heavy focus on the OL in the draft. OT Joseph Noteboom and OG Brian Allen were their top two picks, and the team added Jamil Demby from Maine at #192. Not to be outdone on the defensive side, the team added five players to the DL. Despite the 11 picks, the only bona fide "steal" was Oklahoma Edge Rusher Ogbonnia Okoronkwo; he ranked #61 on DraftTek's Big Board. Good value was also had in selecting Louisville's Trevon Young, also an Edge guy. Young was #106 on our board, but the Rams took him at #205. We like the strategy of keeping the trenches well stocked with fresh players,b ut at the end of the draft (in RD6 and RD7), it seemed like the team was just throwing darts to see if one would stick. Let's see if John Franklin-Myers (#320 on our Board), Demby (#423), and Travin Howard (not ranked) are still on the roster after final cuts.

Grade: B- (for Cooks)

19 Miami Dolphins                 





The Miami Dolphins started out the 2018 draft hotter than summer in South Beach when they landed a top-5 talent with the 11th pick in Minkah Fitzpatrick; the fast, physical, and versatile DB known for taking on TEs, which was a huge problem for Miami in 2017. On Day 2, the Dolphins kept their hot streak going, addressing their need at LB with Ohio State's Jerome Baker, whose speed and coverage skills make him a strong fit for the weak side. On the other side of the ball, Miami tabbed hyper-athletic move TE Mike Gesicki as their Julius Thomas replacement. Gesicki showed off his wheels with a 4.54 forty at the Combine and an eye-popping 41.5" in vertical jump. Like Thomas, Gesicki is a former basketball/volleyball player that excelled at winning jump balls in college and could have an Evan Engram-like impact as a rookie. If you're worried about Gesicki's blocking, the Phins took care of that in RD4 by adding former Notre Dame TE, Durham Smythe, who is an ideal complement as an old-school in-line blocker who can maul in the run game, while still offering solid route running, a big frame, and strong hands in the pass game. Smythe should be especially lethal near the goal line. Also taken in RD4 was RB Kalen Ballage, who could turn out to be an absolute steal. At 6'3 and 229 lbs. Ballage has sub-4.5 speed and has the hands and route running ability to line up in the slot. However, he has the power to pound between the tackles and the vision and elusiveness to contribute as a return man. Ballage has the potential third head of a monster RB trio that already included Kenyan Drake an Frank Gore. Miami's remaining picks were less thrilling, but hold plenty of upside: Cornell Armstrong is a versatile, but undersized CB who models his game after former Dolphin Brent Grimes. Quentin Poling is another speedy coverage LB who could make the roster as a special-teams ace, but will face some stiff competition from UDFA Mike McCray. McCray may be less athletic, but he's one of the more instinctive linebackers from the 2018 class. The draft wrapped up with Kicker Jason Sanders who will also face competition from UDFA Greg Joseph. Both kickers boast strong legs, but will need to prove they can be accurate after both finishing their college careers 25 for 35 on FG tries. While it would have been nice to see Miami add a QB, especially with Luke Falk falling into RD6, given the less than inspiring performances we've seen from backup Brock Osweiler. Otherwise, the Dolphins showed patience, letting the draft come to them. They seem to have set up a strong supporting cast for Ryan Tannehill to have a bounce-back year as he attempts to rebound from the torn ACL that cost him all of last season.

Grade: B

20 Minnesota Vikings                 





The Vikings' 2018 draft class has received mixed reviews virtually across the board from both fans and pundits alike. In this analysts' opinion, it was a much better draft than GM Rick Spielman is getting credit for. RD1 pick Mike Hughes, a cornerback from UCF, was a target of the Vikings. I had a grab on him for about half of the draft season before I targeted Frank Ragnow and Billy Price as the draft approached (both of whom were off the board when Minnesota picked at #30). If you aren't convinced that Hughes was worthy of this pick, read this. One of the more-disappointing selections, particularly in the fans' eyes, was Brian O'Neill, an offensive tackle from Pitt. O'Neill is very underrated as a prospect, and many feel he has a higher ceiling than any other offensive tackle in this class, including our resident OL expert, Longball. A former Dallas Cowboys' scout even mentioned him as potentially the top OT prospect in the draft, drawing comparisons to David Bakhtiari and Nate Solder. On Day 3, things were up and down. Jalyn Holmes is intriguing, but time will tell whether he fits schematically with what the defense is doing. Tyler Conklin will probably follow in the footsteps of David Morgan, Bucky Hodges, and MyCole Pruitt; Day 3 tight ends who impress in training camp and emerge as fan favorites. Hopefully he ends up more like Morgan and less like the latter two. Daniel Carlson was widely viewed as the best kicker in the draft, so that's definitely a pick that could pan out in the long term. Ade Aruna is a late-round flier as an athletic edge rusher, like Danielle Hunter was coming into the league, only Aruna's 6 months older than Hunter, so expectations should be altered accodingly. Overall, this is a strong draft for the Vikings, adding 3 or 4 potential contributors from a group of Day 3 prospects that was weaker than normal.

Grade: B+

21 New England Patriots                 





Almost nothing is stranger than the New England Patriots' draft strategy each spring. Often taking players far before they are projected to go, it seems that the Patriots are wholly unaware of value during draft-time. Yet...it works? Kind of? It will be interesting to see how this strategy plays out when the team doesn't have TB12 at the helm. Will the Patriots still be able to overcome their historically-poor drafting? This roster simply isn't very good, and my sense is that consistently winning will get significantly tougher very soon. All that said, the Patriots took some good --REALLY good-- players with approximately accurate value in the first two rounds of this Draft. Isaiah Wynn and Sony Michel were no-brainers in RD1, and it sounds like the Pats are going to give Wynn a chance to start at OT before moving him into OG. Michel will give the Pats an element to their offense they haven't had since Corey Dillon: a truly-scary RB to take pressure off of the passing game. My Duke Dawson comp was Devin McCourty before the Draft...and look at where he ended up! Dawson is just the type of DB that thrives in Belichick's defensive scheme: tough, versatile, and smart. After that, the Patriots' draft completely falls off for me. I did not expect any of their remaining players to get drafted, and neither did most Draft pundits around the web. One interesting thing? Braxton Berrios is literally Danny Amendola reincarnated. I believe Belichick told Danny; 'We have your clone coming in the draft. We need you to leave.' Mr. Berrios, welcome to the perfect situation for a below-average athlete, rookie WR! Picking up extra picks next year slightly elevates this grade, but at some point, the Patriots are going to have to reload on blue-chip players (Oh, and a QB), and only one player in this Draft, Sony Michel, has a chance at being a blue-chipper.

Grade: C+

22 New Orleans Saionts                 





While many were watching anxiously to see if Sean Payton and Mickey Loomis were going to move up and grab Lamar Jackson, the reality set in that this draft isn't the one that produces the heir-apparent to Drew Brees. Whether or not the Saints' trade to move up and grab Marcus Davenport pays off will be for another day (years) to evaluate. For now, the "potential" looks promising. If you go by the history of DEs that have been drafted by New Orleans (8 since 1987), they've ended up doing pretty well in almost every case. The additional picks were an assortment of eyebrow-raisers and "Oh, cool!" moments. The former we could attribute to the selection of Florida State Tackle Rick Leonard, with the latter reserved for Louisiana Tech RB Boston Scott. Overall, the draft looks about average, with a couple of players that may one day turn out to be very, very good and help lead the team to another playoff run. There wasn't any single addition that can immediately make us say, "Oh wow, NOW they are going to the Super Bowl!" However, this draft did give them more depth in specific areas, and with Davenport on board, that may finally allow Cam Jordan to shed some of those double-teams he's had to endure for so long.

Grade: B

23 NY Giants                 





New GM Dave Gettleman came back to the Giants with a plan that leans heavily on running the football, stopping the run, and rushing the passer. One by one, he checked off the boxes and stayed remarkably true to the script with his top picks. In RD1, they added Saquon Barkley, arguably the best player in this year's draft and a once-in-a-generation RB. Barkley figures to pay instant dividends for a Giants' offense that has not produced thirty points since the last game of the 2015 season. Understanding Saquon Barkley alone was not enough to rejuvenate a ground game that ranked 26th in rushing yards and 28th in rushing TD's in 2017, Big Blue ran to the podium in RD2 to land UTEP mauler, Will Hernandez, one of the premier offensive linemen in the draft. The Giants' two RD3 picks and RD5 pick were selected to help pressure the passer and defend the run. In particular, EDGE Lorenzo Carter out of Georgia could become productive early in sub packages and oozes athletic upside. In RD4, Big Blue created some waves and selected Richmond QB Kyle Lauletta, setting up intriguing competition with Davis Webb, last year's RD3 pick out of Cal, to be both the back-up to and possibly long-term successor for Eli Manning. The Giants have been nearly universally praised for their 2018 NFL draft, and rightfully so. Value met need early and often for a new GM committed to a plan. Fantastic job by Dave Gettleman and the Giants. - Kevin McWalters, Giants Analyst

Grade: A

24 NY Jets                 





The main goal of this draft for Jets' GM Mike Maccagnan was to nab a quality QB in RD1. The addition of 20-year-old USC QB Sam Darnold, the top prospect on our Big Board, feels like a steal here. Maccagnan should be commended for the trade he made with Indy. To end up with a quality prospect like Darnold without giving up a future RD 1 pick rarely happens. Leonard Williams was pumped to see his fellow USC alumni join him in New York. I suspect he also liked the fact the Jets opted to strengthen the D-Line with the additions of D2 Monster, Nathan Shephard, in RD3, and Folorunso Fatukasi in RD6. With the loss of Richardson and Wilkerson, Williams needed some more help to ease the pressure on his shoulders.

Barring injury, RD4 pick Chris Herndon should make an impact at the TE position this year, given the lack of established quality on the Depth Chart. Maccagnan finished off a great Draft by adding Tulane CB and PFFs' 55th-overall-ranked player, Parry Nickerson, in RD6. Nickerson ran a 4.32 forty and had a 41.7 Passer Rating Against in 2017 and an unbelievable 32.5 Passer Rating Against in 2016. He should push the inconsistent Buster Skrine at Nickel this year and could end up being the steal of the Draft. - Rich Tinley, Jets Analyst

Overall Grade: A

25 Oakland Raiders                 





A head-scratching Thursday and Friday was followed by a relatively-strong Saturday. Here's the good news: Oakland knew what they wanted to do, they stuck to their board, and they showed tremendous conviction in their selections. The bad news: their evaluation of prospects like Kolton Miller, P.J. Hall, and Brandon Parker stands in stark contrast to just about all other GMs. Let's start with RD1. Entering the draft, OT was the Raiders' biggest need, but it was Mike McGlinchey that was the prospect most saw as the best fit. Instead, it was the UCLA product who was available, and the big guy possesses length and athleticism but also plenty of questionable tape. The same can be said for Parker, a small school product who is a project. While Miller may start this year, he needs good coaching, and I'm not sure Tom Cable can deliver that. Another prospect from lower-level competition is P.J. Hall, who delivered a stellar Pro Day and could be a real find. Still, it's hard to believe he would not have been available in later rounds. In RD3, Arden Key is a high-risk, high-reward prospect who could either develop into a double-digit sack artist or be out of the league this time next year- or anything in between. On Day 3, Oakland nabbed a solid-value prospect in Nick Nelson, a Wisconsin corner who probably is a better version of T.J. Carrie. The Raiders MAY have also gotten the steal of the draft in RD5 with DT Maurice Hurst, a RD1 level talent who, if his heart condition allows him to play, could be an immediate and long-terrm starter. At Punter, Johnny Townsend could bring the same production as Marquette King, minus the drama and expensive contract. I don't get the sense in selecting troublesome Azeem Victor --yet another late-round linebacker-- but I do think WR Marcell Ateman makes the roster and is impactful in 2018. There's a lot of IFs in this draft. IF Kolton Miller and Brandon Parker can live up to their potential and become solid starters. IF P.J. Hall can be productive after a GIANT leap in competition. IF Arden Key can stay out of trouble, and IF Maurice Hurst's heart can hold up. Another IF is manifested in WR Martavis Bryant, a key acquistition made possible by the RD1 trade-down. Can Bryant stay healthy, out of trouble, and in a Raiders uniform for more than a year? All these "ifs" make the draft difficult to grade, but, without one prospect as a near-certain standout, I can't give the class a strong mark.

Grade: C

26 Philadelphia Eagles                 





When it comes to grading drafts, the national talking heads usually give the highest grades to the teams with the highest picks. Well, we here at DraftTek don't coddle teams that suck at football with charity A's, nor give out automatic C's to good teams drafting at the end of each round. Rather, we judge based on how each team used the draft capital at its disposal, regardless of how high the pick was.

The Eagles' best move came with their first selection when they turned the 32nd pick into ultra-athletic TE Dallas Goedert AND a 2019 RD2 pick via a trade with the Ravens. Because another TE was one of the few needs on the team, and because Goedert was such a highly-rated proscpect, the South Dakota State tight end was widely considered a possibility at RD1#32. To get him at RD2#49, with a future second-rounder to boot, was a strong move. Jumping right in front of Dallas to nab him (giving David Akers the chance to flat out PUNK the Cowboys in their own stadium) was a guilty pleasure all Eagles' fans enjoyed. Fourth round CB Avonte Maddox is a super-quick player with cat-like reflexes (and cat-like size). He may have been a bit of a reach at RD4, however if Maddox can help in the return game, then it makes sense. A few picks later, the Eagles possibly struck gold with the very athletic edge rusher Josh Sweat from FSU. If not for health concerns, he's a potential first-rounder. With their last two picks, the Eagles took two very interesting offensive tackles that I've done a LOT of research on and am very intriguied by their ability to...oh wait, I've never heard of them, and neither have you.

For the sake of simplicity, I'll exclude the veteran players acquired with the Eagles' RD2 (Wentz), RD3 (Darby), RD4 (Ajayi), and RD5 (Michael Bennett) picks. I also don't care what perceived "holes" were ignored; I simply care about picking good players. The five players drafted (plus the 2019 RD2 pick acquired) were a solid haul.

- Broz, Eagles Analyst

Grade: B+

27 Pittsburgh Steelers                 





Steelers' Nation is still reeling from this draft. Badly needing depth and future starters at Linebacker, the team spent 3 of its 4 Top-100 picks on offense. Some are forcing down the Kool-Aid and coming around to having 5 starting safeties and no linebacker depth while the kerosene-and-pitchfork crowd is on unusually solid ground. RD1 pick Edmunds is a complete sSafety, a bit in the Polamalu mold, with the size and physicality to play in the box and the speed and smarts to play deep. This is a quality player that will help the team. First-round value is debatable to some, but the teams picking ultimately set that value. With no obvious starting spot available, Edmunds will feature heavily in sub-packages, which the team runs more than half the time. Second rounder Washington is a very solid, high-floor player to replace the outside threat lost in the most-excellent Martavis Bryant deal. RD3 will be hard to judge for a couple of years. The team bypassed clear needs to pull in QB Rudolph at an undeniable value. Okorafor, a very large and heavy-footed developmental tackle, will be keeping OL Coach Muchak busy for years to come. Day 3 added SS Marcus Allen, who better love special teams to get a helmet, and a nifty receiving back, Samuels, from NC State. The last pick, Frazier, will add competition to the bottom of the D-Line roster. The Steelers outwardly make it a point of pride to get value in the draft. There were about 10 players passed by in the Top 100 that could have addressed the need at the run-and-hit "Mack" linebacker role. Likewise, the OLB group that produced only 14 sacks in 2018 and lost 2 players this offseason remains a weakness. The downside of that pride in value is that, in the closing years of Ben's window, the Steelers added players with no clear path to the field and left holes in the roster to be filled by some lucky UDFA.

Grade: C-

28 San Francisco 49ers                 





John Lynch's first draft class proved to be an easy A last season; his sophomore effort is a little tougher to grade. I think Lynch and Shanahan are once again giving themselves an A for picking up some high-character, scheme-friendly players that add depth and enhance special teams as they rebuild the roster. From an outsider's standpoint it feels like they may have passed on more-talented players and failed to address what looked like key areas of need. San Francisco's failure to add an impact pass rusher is a big vote of confidence for Cassius Marsh and Ronald Blair, who flashed late in the season, and for the continued development of Solomon Thomas, who had an up-and-down rookie season. The decision not to add an interior OL gives the sense that they are comfortable with Josh Garnett's progress and with how free-agent addition Jonathan Cooper will fit with the team. Though I was disappointed the team passed on Minkah Fitzpatrick, Lynch played his hand in RD1 masterfully, holding on to Trent Brown until OT Mike McGlinchey was shaking the Commissioner's hand holding up a 49ers' jersey; keeping him from crosstown rival Oakland, and then quickly shipping Brown to the Patriots. Knowing McGlinchey was always the target makes the pick look better. It doesn't hurt that the former Golden-Domer looks like a 10-year starter at RT and has the potential to move to LT if Joe Staley ever fails to pancake Father Time. On Day 2, the 44th-overall pick felt rich for WR Dante Pettis, but watching him on tape, Pettis shows a rare ability to work himself open on all three levels and was electric as a record-setting punt returner. Shanahan envisions using Pettis at all three WR spots, but he may need to get stronger if he wants to stick outside. In RD3, LB Fred Warner and DB Tarvarius Moore were late risers with provide huge upside and depth at positions of need. Fred plays Linebacker like a big safety. He's a perfect fit at ILB, providing needed depth behind Reuben Foster and Malcolm Smith with a chance for early playing time if he can earn it in camp. Moore is likely a developmental prospect as a rookie whose size/speed combo and sticky man-coverage skills make him an ideal understudy for Richard Sherman. However, he could face competition for that role with undrafted rookie CB Tarvarus McFadden, who tumbled out of the draft due to poor ball production and a slow forty time, but shows solid press skills on tape. Day 3 provided some sneaky potential steals early in DL Kentavius Street, who will miss his rookie season after tearing his ACL in a pre-draft workout. He was praised as an athletic freak prior to the injury. If Street returns to form he could be a dominant edge-setter in the run game with respectable potential as a pocket pusher. Cornerback DJ Reed is a feisty, physical nickel corner who could compete right away for the starting job. Later in the day, the Niners looked to round out the roster, grabbing S Marcell Harris and DL Julian Temple. They'll need to prove they can stay healthy, but could provide depth at their respective positions while seeing time early on special teams. The Niners ended with wild-card WR Richie James, who shows remarkable contact balance at just 5'10, 183 lbs as well as strong hands and the kind of quickness that gives defenders fits. James may face an uphill climb to make the roster, but count on hearing his name plenty in training camp. All told, it wasn't quite the draft I thought we'd be getting. While I think there was some room for improvement, Lynch once again did a nice job supplementing with UDFAs. I can't wait to see these guys take the field. - Brett Clancy, 49ers Analyst (@thebrettclancy on Twitter)

Grade: B+

29 Seattle Seahawks                 





Seeing Shaquill Griffin's twin brother drafted by Seattle might be the feel-good story of the draft. But this isn't some publicity stunt; if Shaquem had two hands, he would have been a Day-One pick. Griffin will likely slot in as an OLB in the 4-3 defense, while occasionally spelling KJ Wright in nickel. The other big news for the Hawks was their RD1 pick, when they took Rashaad Penny after trading back. Initially, I gave a C- grade on the pick, but after seeing videos like this one from PFF, and hearing that Schneider received a trade offer for Penny right after taking him; this selection sits much better. Seattle did have a large need at RB and they got their favorite target while also grabbing more picks from Green Bay. Seattle made seven other picks and helped fill a variety of needs. Rasheem Green and Jacob Martin will help add passing depth, specifically with Green looking like a direct replacement for Michael Bennett. Will Dissly was talked about as the best blocking TE in this draft. Corner was addressed with Tre Flowers, a player that looks like a typical Seahawk DB. Drafting a punter in RD5 was a good move to help save money, as Jon Ryan might be too rich for Seattle's blood. Reports are that Jamarco Jones will compete at LT, allowing George Fant to move to RT where his run-blocking will be more useful. Alex McGough might feel like a head-scratcher, but with Trevone Boykin's release, the Hawks needed someone for the backup QB role to compete with Austin Davis. Overall, this was a good draft for the Seahawks. Pre-season should see some interesting positional battles. ~ @JefferyMChapman, Seahawks Analyst

Grade: A

30 Tampa Bay Buccaneers                 





The Bucs entered the draft with two top-100 picks (one 1st and one 2nd) and finished with an RD1, three RD2s, and an RD3. Trading their #7 to the Bills allowed the Bucs to collect extra draft picks and select the same guy they'd get at #7 --massive DT Vita Vea. Their first pick in the 2nd round was at a critical need (RB), and the team picked up Ronald Jones of USC.

DraftTek's weekly mocks leading up to the draft regularly featured the Vea-Jones pairing (pat on back!), but the desperately-needed secondary help had to wait until the 4th round. Due to keen horse-trading, the team was able to add not one, but two CBs in RD2 in Calton Davis and MJ Stewart. RD2 draftees are far more likely to develop into starter level talent than Day-3 picks, so kudos to GM Jason Licht. The Bucs' draft was rounded out with depth adds at OL, S, LB, and WR (Alex Kappa, Jerome Whitehead, Jack Cichy, and Justin Watson). Non FBS-schoolers Kappa and Watson could develop in to starters. I can't see how the outcome could have been better!

Grade: A+

31 Tennessee Titans                 





Tennessee only walked out of this Draft with four players, which isn't very exciting, considering it's Year One of a whole new coaching staff. Fortunately, Jon Robinson has done a great job in previous drafts, so the Titans were able to use the capital they went in with to move up and get "their guys," without sacrificing the future. Though I'm not 100% certain it was needed, the team started by moving up for Rashaan Evans to solidify their Linebacker situation --now without Avery Williamson-- by only giving up their RD4 and receiving a RD6 in the process. Then, the following day, Tennessee went way up the board, moving from #57 to #41 to go get Harold Landry, a first-round talent at Edge Rusher that fell due to injury concerns. But that move cost them their third-round pick. So yes, Tennessee only left the draft with four players, but they grabbed two first-round-caliber players. To round out their draft class, the Titans added Safety Dane Crulkshank to build depth in the secondary, and added Luke Falk as a potentially-solid backup QB for Mariota, who has missed at least one game every season of his young career. They didn't address the offensive skill positions at all in the draft, but went and added high-skill UDFAs like WR Deontay Burnett and RB Akrum Wadley, both of whom could compete for roster spots this season. Overall, they don't have the sheer number of draftees, but they did a great job effectively using the picks they had.

Grade: B+

32 Washington Redskins                 





While the Redskins' RD1 pick left something to be desired with Derwin James and Tremaine Edwards still on the board, Da'Ron Payne (Grade: B+) met the team's specific need at NT. I believe the Redskins meant it when they said that they had a group of similarly-graded players, and Payne likely fit the Redskins best. In RD2, the Redskins miraculously tra+C14:D34ded down and still landed Derrius Guice (Grade: A+), fulfilling Chris Cooley's 'dream scenario' that I referenced last week, AND they landed the toolsy OT Geron Christian (Grade: B+) in RD3, who will serve as the team's swing tackle until he is ready to start in a year or two. The Apke (Grade: C+) pick in RD4 is based on pure traits, but I would ignore the forty time and check his elite 3-cone time. Tim Settle (Grade: A) in the 5th is an absolute steal, providing even more meat and potential upfront on the Redskins' new DL for Jim Tomsula to mold, while stealing a pure-upside pick from the Patriots, Shaun Dion Hamilton (Grade: B+), who was starting over Rashaan Evans when healthy. Greg Stroman (Grade: B) might help in the nickel and in the return game, and Trey Quinn (Grade: A) is far from Mr. Irrelevant, as he led the NCAA in catches and led his team (including 'red-zone threat' Courtland Sutton) in TDs. Early prediction: Quinn will start a few games in the slot in 2018. Overall, the Redskins addressed all of their needs beyond OG, and since it sounds like the Christian pick will allow Ty Nsekhe to move to OG, the masterful combination of value and filling of needs gives the Redskins an A for the 2018 NFL Draft. - Kennedy Paynter, Draft Analyst (@Kennedy_Paynter on Twitter)

Grade: A






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Oklahoma
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Texas
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West Virginia
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Oklahoma
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Oklahoma
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Texas
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Texas
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Texas
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111 Poona Ford
Texas
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Iowa State
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Texas Tech
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152 Marcell Ateman
Oklahoma State
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Kansas St
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Oklahoma State
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182 Will Geary
Kansas State
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